Chinese Medicine and Humour

Book Cover: The Yellow Monkey Emperor’s Classic of Chinese Medicine
Editions:Paperback - First Edition: $ 29.95
ISBN: 184819286X
Size: 6.70 x 10.10 in
Pages: 272

A horse complains of a chest as tight as a bear's embrace, a goat bleats about skin as dry as parchment, and a rat describes his urine as darker than soya sauce. Join these lively characters and their friends as they seek diagnosis from wise animal sages and the yellow monkey emperor.

Covering 78 syndromes of Chinese medicine, these cartoons graphically illustrate the disturbances and illnesses that can affect the organs of the body, or Zang Fu, as they are understood in Chinese medicine. They are accompanied by a concise list of symptoms for easy diagnostic reference. Combining Damo Mitchell's deep knowledge and experience with Spencer Hill's witty cartoons, this is a fun way to learn, remember and be entertained by the syndromes and their symptoms.

Published:
Publisher: Singing Dragon
Illustrators:
Genres:
Tags:
Reviews:John Byrne wrote:

Harmony plays a big part both in Chinese Medicine and cartooning. Not only must the cartoonist produce amusing drawings, but each drawing also needs to clearly communicate its concept, whether serious or funny. Cartoons which are intended as aids to understanding and memory introduce one more vital requirement to the harmony - a deep knowledge and affinity with the concepts being conveyed. Spencer Hill's cartoons harmonise these ingredients beautifully and, coupled with Damo Mitchell's expertly and clearly written text, will enable any reader to balance laughter and learning with the greatest of ease

Rachel Morris wrote:

It's a fabulous text book. If you're a student who learns through visual cues, this is the Chinese Medicine book for you. The graphic novel, comic strip style, travel story is punctuated by diagrams summarizing the main symptoms of each problem, so it's easy to navigate through the book... More text books should be put together like this. Perhaps this approach to learning would be exactly the way to engage visual learners in all sorts of subjects

Matthew Noe wrote:

As someone whose knowledge of Chinese medicine has primarily been limited to the negative cultural stereotypes that exist in the United States for such practices, YME (Yellow Monkey Emperor) was a perfect place to begin. By pairing words and images with stories, it became more plausible as an outsider to understand the methods, the reasoning, and the potential treatments for these ailments than I believe would have been possible otherwise... All-in-all, The Yellow Monkey Emperor's Classic of Chinese Medicine is a fun, beautifully colored comic introduction to Chinese medicine that I recommend to anyone


www.scholarsage.com

Book Cover: Daoist Reflections from Scholar Sage
Editions:Paperback - First Edition: $ 29.64
ISBN: 1848193211
Size: 6.00 x 9.00 in
Pages: 312

This collection of fascinating short reads on Daoist thought, including Chinese medicine brings together some of the most popular articles from the Scholar Sage online magazine, alongside new material from Damo Mitchell. It includes:

· How the teaching of the 'three worms' (Sanchong) demonstrates the way Daoism pulls together models of the physical, energetic, spiritual and psychological
· A translation of and commentary on the Classic of Breath and Qi Consolidation, an important Daoist classical poem that discusses the relationship of Jing and Qi in the body
· The importance of the pineal gland in Daoist alchemical thought
· The internal alchemy of Fire, Water, Dragon and Tiger
· The meaning behind the pairs of Fu Dogs often seen guarding the entrances of Chinese temples, government buildings and restaurants
· How Fa Jin works
· How increasing your 'excitement threshold' can help you to find contentment in states of perpetual centeredness
· Understanding and using food energetics
· And much more.

Helping you to think about your practice in new ways, the book features contributions from senior students at the Lotus Nei Gong School of Daoist Arts, including Roni Edlund, Paul Mitchell, Donna Pinker and Dr Seb Smith.

Reviews:R Scott Malone wrote:

Love, love, love it!
Great book, great information and I'll bet he has enough for 6 more like it!
I'd buy everything he has written in hardback and call it a proper library


Meridian Theory in Nei Gong

Book Cover: Heavenly Streams
Editions:Paperback - First Edition: $ 29.95
ISBN: 1848191162
Size: 9.00 x 9.00 in
Pages: 304

The art of connecting with, feeling and adjusting the energy body using the consciousness is a key aspect of Nei Gong and Qi Gong. It sits somewhere between Qi Gong, meditation and the lesser-known art of Shen Gong, and although it is known in China it has never before been written about in an accessible way in the West.

Damo Mitchell provides step-by-step instructions on how to experience the various elements which make up the energy body, explaining how to identify and feel these, and how to diagnose imbalances and restore harmony. He describes the nature of the five elements, the meridians and the meridian points, inviting the reader to experience them through guided internal exercises using the body, breath and mind. Instructional drawings and photographs are included throughout the book.

Connecting the fundamentals of Chinese medicine with the lesser-known spiritual and esoteric aspects of practice, this book will be of great interest to intermediate and advanced practitioners of Qi Gong, Nei Gong, Taijiquan and Chinese medicine.

Published:
Publisher: Singing Dragon
Genres:
Tags:
Reviews:Zhongxian Wu wrote:

Like all the ancient Daoist traditions, the art of classical Chinese medicine is one rooted in experiential learning. In Heavenly Streams, Damo Mitchell shares an inner method to access our meridians and points. It is a valuable guidebook for those interested in practicing with the subtle energies of their own bodies

Steve Galloway wrote:

Delivered with an informal familiarity that has already sparked so many imaginations at Damo's course lectures across Europe and the United States, Heavenly Streams peels away Daoism's persistently obscure mystical dogma to put today's practitioners in touch with internal arts and the energetic realm